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Graveyards of Human Rights: thoughts on the refugee camps on Lesvos in light of the UNHCR’s 70th ann

Cases of sexual violence inside refugee camps are often presented as if they were tragic accidents, or natural and isolated events. However, sexual violence is endemic to refugee camps and it has escalated over time. Despite these facts, evidence and warnings, refugee populations are systematically abandoned into structurally harmful environments which not only allow, but also create the conditions for such atrocious acts of violence to take place.

Who says what? Studying social media discourses on international protection

Who’s name is mentioned more frequently in social media content related to refuge and migration: Angelina Jolie, Pope Francis, or Donal Trump? Are some refugee groups mentioned more frequently than others? Do social media discussions respond to real world events related to asylum and migration policy? In this vlog, Anamaria Dutceac Segesten presents some of PROTECT’s preliminary results from our research on social media discourses on refugees and migrants.

Minors and shipwrecks in the Mediterranean: a never-ending story

Youssef and Alan are only two of too many children who have lost their lives on the move in recent years. The International Migration Organization (IOM) reported that 337 children have died while migrating in Africa between 2014–2018, 200 of them died as a result of drowning in the Mediterranean sea. However, this number does not reflect the grim reality: according to IOM, over 70 per cent of people whose deaths were reported in the Central Mediterranean between 2014 and 2018 were never found.

Migration flows to Europe: a new Tunisian exodus

In Tunisia, deterioration of the economic situation, a rising unemployment rate and the reduction of civil rights is currently causing a new flow of Tunisian migrants heading for Italy, seeking both work and safety in Europe. The silent, growing and continuous exodus from Tunisia is a new form of migration and should spark a revision of international norms on international protection and a new form of migration governance aiming at capturing determinants, processes, and outcomes of the actual migration. What can the Tunisian exodus teach us about current protection needs?