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Beyond Ukraine: Will the EU Expand Asylum Access and Rights?

The catastrophic humanitarian toll of the Russo-Ukrainian conflict has been met by much-heightened attention and openness by Europe so far, with the Union taking the unprecedented step of activating the Temporary Protection Directive (European Commission 2022) and even previously reluctant countries such as the United Kingdom and Poland establishing substantial incentives for solidarity with Ukrainian […]

HORIZON 2020 JOINT VIRTUAL EVENT ON THE PROTECTION OF UKRAINIAN REFUGEES

On May 5th, 2022 a webinar on the “Temporary Protection for People Fleeing the War in Ukraine. Challenges Ahead and the Way Forward for a Common EU Response”, was jointly organized by Sergio Carrera, ASILE Project Coordinator, Luc Leboeuf, VULNER Project Coordinator, and Hakan G. Sicakkan, PROTECT Project Coordinator. Researchers and external collaborators of the […]

Migration as a polarizing issue on social media

Social media are one of the main arenas in which European citizens discuss policy issues such as migration and in which opinion formation on such issues takes place through the sharing and consumption of information and views. At the same time, it is an arena in which traditional and alternative media, NGOs, and politicians share their views on migration and interact with citizens to promote their agenda. For this reason, social media are a melting pot of different actors and interests, and a lens through which the European discourse on migration can be studied. Social media offer both, a huge potential for, on the one side, the free and democratic exchange and, on the other, for polarization and manipulation of the European discourse on migration.

Upcoming Policy Roundtable on migration and migrants in the EU

Together with nine other EU-funded research projects, PROTECT is co-organizing a joint policy roundtable on Co-designing an inclusive Europe, with a focus on Migrations and migrants in the EU: changing narratives – modifying practices – influencing policies. The aim is to bring together researchers, practitioners, journalists, and policy-makers to discuss the potential of re-interpreting existing […]

Relocating asylum seekers or paying someone else to do it for you? What citizens have to say

Relocation of asylum seekers has been at the heart of fierce controversies over the past decade. When the refugee crisis erupted in Europe in 2014-2016, the large inflows of asylum seekers shed light on the inadequacy of a system that everyone knew to be wobbly: the Dublin Regulation. Said Regulation aims to determine which EU member state is responsible for a given asylum claim lodged in the block. It relies on a hierarchy of principles that most often ends up in attributing responsibility to the member states whose border has been irregularly crossed. For mere geographical reasons, the states that happen to be located at the external borders of the EU are the ones bearing much of the responsibility. While this system somehow works so long as influxes are low, the sizeable increases of the years 2014-2016 clearly unveiled its limits; with Italy and Greece struggling to deal with the situation and calling for solidarity from their fellow member states.

Why are you a Refugee? Afghans and the US Identity Database

One of the questions which arises constantly in the context of data protection debates and discussion in Europe is why so much protection is needed and why so much attention is given to state use of our data when we have nothing to hide. This argument comes up again and again in political and academic […]