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News from PROTECT

Protect partner presentation: Ryerson University

The Ryerson team is led by Associate Professor Idil Atak, joining her are the early career Ph.D. fellows, Zainab Abu Alrob, and Jona Zyfi. Together, they will drive the Canadian-oriented research of PROTECT, involving fieldwork among migrants and refugees in Canadian cities and co-leading PROTECT’s dissemination and engagement work.

Protect partner presentations: The University of Stuttgart

Two researchers from the Institute for Social Science at the University of Stuttgart, Germany are part of the international PROTECT consortium: Tenure-track Professor, Raphael Heiko Heiberger, and Research Assistant, Sara Schmitt. By applying their knowledge of computational methods, the Stuttgart team will contribute to analyzing how global media discourses on refugee protection and citizens’ attitudes towards the Global Compacts’ burden- and responsibility-sharing aspects shape political decision making.

The challenge of making academic research feed into policy debates: three lessons to take away from ...

Academics play a significant role in public policy debates, providing evidence-based advice and offering a measured voice. But researchers’ engagement should not a one-way street: academics also have to make sure they listen carefully to the needs of the public and provide them with advice and research of real use. Three main lessons from the Brexit process might help us along the way.

Protect partner presentations: The University of Bergen

University of Bergen team

The University of Bergen on the southwestern coast of Norway is the leading partner of Protect. The university houses the initiator and project leader of Protect, Professor Hakan G. Sicakkan, as well as the rest of Protect’s Coordination and Management Office and Bergen-based researchers. This article dives into the research interests and contributions of the Bergen team.

As the Corona pandemic worsens, EU borders shut down: “A new low point for the EU’s respect for refu

Human rights in international law and the EU Charter are not dispensable in times of pandemics. They are essential characteristics and integral to promoting the European Way of Life which “is founded on the values of the respect for human dignity, freedom, democracy, equality, the rule of law and respect for the human rights, including the rights of persons belonging to minorities.”