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EU puts ‘Dublin to bed’ and launches New Pact on Migration and Asylum.

The overcrowded Moria camp has become an image of a failed collective effort to create cross-European solidarity for refugees and asylum seekers. On 23 September 2020 the European Commission launched their New Pact on Migration and Asylum aimed at replacing the heavily criticized Dublin Regulation. But what exactly is the ‘Dublin problem’ – and which solutions do the new pact hold? Four migration researchers offer their views below.

Disaster Foretold: Refugees in Moria at risk after fires. What now, EU?

As much as the Greek state tries to present the fire and misery that unfolded as an unpredictable event and a state of emergency, this disaster was preventable, foreseeable and, therefore, foretold and avoidable. It is the outcome of a series of inadequate and patchy political decisions as well as the largely exclusionary, discriminatory and deterrent policies that have been implemented within and beyond the EU’s borders.

Protect partner presentations: The University of Giessen

Meet PROTECT’s team of legal scholars from the Justus Liebig University Giessen in Germany, led by one of Europe’s leading experts in migration law, Professor Jürgen Bast. Bast’s team explores the legal implications of the Global Compacts on Refugees and Migrants and how they as young soft-law instruments interact with pre-existing legal frameworks.

Protect partner presentations: Ryerson University

The Ryerson team is led by Associate Professor Idil Atak, joining her are the early career Ph.D. fellows, Zainab Abu Alrob, and Jona Zyfi. Together, they will drive the Canadian-oriented research of PROTECT, involving fieldwork among migrants and refugees in Canadian cities and co-leading PROTECT’s dissemination and engagement work.

Protect partner presentations: The University of Stuttgart

Two researchers from the Institute for Social Science at the University of Stuttgart, Germany are part of the international PROTECT consortium: Tenure-track Professor, Raphael Heiko Heiberger, and Research Assistant, Sara Schmitt. By applying their knowledge of computational methods, the Stuttgart team will contribute to analyzing how global media discourses on refugee protection and citizens’ attitudes towards the Global Compacts’ burden- and responsibility-sharing aspects shape political decision making.